Tanganyika Cichlids Shell Dwellers


How to set up an Tanganyikan Cichlid Tank – Shell Dwellers


World Cichlids Ash Grey T-Shirt World Light T-Shirt by CafePress


World Cichlids Ash Grey T-Shirt World Light T-Shirt by CafePress


$25


This light t-shirt will be fashionable even after the zombie Apocalypse. In fact, this shirt might be the very reason you’ll survive said Apocalypse. The light color shows you aren’t worried about getting stains – and even if you were, those stains show t World Light T-Shirt Tee, TShirt, Shirt This light t-shirt will be fashionable even after the zombie Apocalypse. In fact, this shirt might be the very reason you’ll survive said Apocalypse. The light color shows you aren’t worried about getting stains – and even if you were, those stains show t

Nimbochromis polystigma - Juvenile


Nimbochromis polystigma – Juvenile


$9.99


Juvenile and female Nimbochromis polystigma have a brown and tan speckeled; camo-like pattern associated with other Nimbochromis cichlids. Mature males lose much of this pattern; especially while breeding; and become iridescent blue with red in the fins. Nimbochromis are ambush predators and will prey on smaller fish. Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. Decor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock �piles� and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics!

Clown Lab - Labidochromis chisumulae


Clown Lab – Labidochromis chisumulae


$14.99


Clown Labs ( Labidochromis chisumulae ) are light blue in color with dark blue vertical stripes as adults. Juveniles lack the dark stripes of the mature males. Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. Decor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock �piles� and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics!

Albino Auratus - Melanochromis auratus - Juvenile


Albino Auratus – Melanochromis auratus – Juvenile


$11.99


Female and juvenile coloration of the Auratus is a combination of bright yellow with black horizontal stripes bordered with white. Adult males have a similar coloration; but they become mostly black with a horizontal white stripe; gray-brown in the dorsal area; and white markings on their fins. Melanochromis are especially aggressive with other male Melanochromis ; particularly if there are females present; and multiple Melanochromis species should not be mixed to prevent cross-breeding. Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. D�cor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock �piles� and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics!

Pseudotropheus saulosi - Juvenile


Pseudotropheus saulosi – Juvenile


$11.99


Pseudotropheus saulosi is classified as a dwarf Mbuna; reaching a size of only 3-4 inches. These colorful little fish come originally from the Taiwan Reef area of Lake Malawi. The males are blue with black vertical bars; and the mouthbrooding females are deep yellow. Fry are all yellow as well; changing colors at maturity. Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. Decor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock �piles� and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics!

Red Top Trewavasae - Labeotropheus trewavasae - Juvenile


Red Top Trewavasae – Labeotropheus trewavasae – Juvenile


$9.99


Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. D�cor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock �piles� and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums.

Red Top Ndumbi - Pseudotropheus sp.


Red Top Ndumbi – Pseudotropheus sp.


$9.99


The male of this variant is powder blue with a rusty red-orange patch on the head. The orange extends through the upper edge of the dorsal fin for a stunning display. Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. Decor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock ”piles” and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics! ** Note about scientific naming : As African cichlids are continually being discovered and redescribed; many scientific names have been changed over time. One of the most affected groups are the fish from the genera Pseudotropheus ; Maylandia ; and Metriaclima . Many of these fish were originally classified in the Pseudotropheus genus but the ”Zebra” group was separated into the Maylandia genus created in 1984. In 1997; the new Metriaclima genus was created as a proposed ”more correct” genus to replace Maylandia . However; the true ”correctness” of the classifications is still highly debated and those three genera are still used interchangeably to refer to the same fish in some references. **

Msuli Yellowtail Acei - Pseudotropheus acei - Juvenile


Msuli Yellowtail Acei – Pseudotropheus acei – Juvenile


$9.99


Pseudotropheus acei is a colorful Mbuna; or rock dwelling cichlid. Both females and males if this variant from the Msuli region are light blue-violet in color with yellow in the dorsal fin and tail. Males are slightly more vibrant and showy. Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. Decor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock �piles� and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics! ** Note about scientific naming : As African cichlids are continually being discovered and redescribed; many scientific names have been changed over time. One of the most affected groups are the fish from the genera Pseudotropheus ; Maylandia ; and Metriaclima . Many of these fish were originally classified in the Pseudotropheus genus but the ”Zebra” group was separated into the Maylandia genus created in 1984. In 1997; the new Metriaclima genus was created as a proposed ”more correct” genus to replace Maylandia . However; the true ”correctness” of the classifications is still highly debated and those three genera are still used interchangeably to refer to the same fish in some references. **

Asakusa Shadow-Dwellers LS-tee Fantasy Long Sleeve T-Shirt by CafePress


Asakusa Shadow-Dwellers LS-tee Fantasy Long Sleeve T-Shirt by CafePress


$31


Rep Asakusa’s local and totally fictional street gang, the Shadow-Dwellers. Ward off all peaceful spirits with this longsleeve, that’s sure to get you into trouble sooner or later -JT Fantasy Long Sleeve T-Shirt Tee, TShirt, Shirt The most comfortable t-shirt ever Our 100% cotton, Hanes Beefy-T is preshrunk, durable and guaranteed. 6.1 oz. 100% luxuriously soft ring spun cotton . Standard fit. Ribbed sleeve cuffs.

Elephant-nose Cichlid - Nimbochromis linni - Juvenile


Elephant-nose Cichlid – Nimbochromis linni – Juvenile


$14.99


The Elephant-nose Cichlid ( Nimbochromis linni ) is similar to other Nimbochromis in mannerisms and color; displaying a blotched and speckled camo-like pattern. Males do gain some color when breeding – blue green in the face; and gold and orange in the fins. These fish can be distinguished by their namesake feature; their elongated snout which allows them to suck prey from rocky crevices. Tankmates must be chosen carefully; as these are predator fish and will eat small fish. Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. Decor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock �piles� and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics!
Thomas Riggson posted at 2013-9-7 Category: Freshwater Aquarium

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