African Albino Cichlid



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AFRICAN CICHLID ( ALBINO) Fish


Albino Kribensis - Pelvicachromis pulcher


Albino Kribensis – Pelvicachromis pulcher


$4.99


These Albino Kribs are dwarf West African cichlids. They are rather undemanding and can do well in most freshwater community tanks. They are most colorful while breeding. Females are white with yellow accents and a violet-red blush on the belly. The male is longer and more slender; but has similar coloration. He may have a faint violet area on his belly as well. Kribensis can be found in a variety of color variants and may have regional color differences depending on where they are collected. They are mainly bottom-dwelling fish and can be kept with other fish as long as the other fish are not flashy or aggressive. All cichlids can become aggressive and territorial while breeding; and may these any show aggression towards other bottom dwelling fish that wander into protected territory. Kribensis will accept spirulina; flake; pellet foods and frozen foods like cichlid formulas or mysis as a supplement.

Albino Auratus - Melanochromis auratus - Juvenile


Albino Auratus – Melanochromis auratus – Juvenile


$11.99


Female and juvenile coloration of the Auratus is a combination of bright yellow with black horizontal stripes bordered with white. Adult males have a similar coloration; but they become mostly black with a horizontal white stripe; gray-brown in the dorsal area; and white markings on their fins. Melanochromis are especially aggressive with other male Melanochromis ; particularly if there are females present; and multiple Melanochromis species should not be mixed to prevent cross-breeding. Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. D�cor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock �piles� and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics!

Albino Zebra - Maylandia zebra - Juvenile


Albino Zebra – Maylandia zebra – Juvenile


$10.99


The Albino Zebra has a pale pinkish-white body with red eyes. Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. D�cor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock �piles� and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics! ** Note about scientific naming : As African cichlids are continually being discovered and redescribed; many scientific names have been changed over time. One of the most affected groups are the fish from the genera Pseudotropheus ; Maylandia ; and Metriaclima . Many of these fish were originally classified in the Pseudotropheus genus but the ”Zebra” group was separated into the Maylandia genus created in 1984. In 1997; the new Metriaclima genus was created as a proposed ”more correct” genus to replace Maylandia . However; the true ”correctness” of the classifications is still highly debated and those three genera are still used interchangeably to refer to the same fish in some references. **

Albino Princess of Burundi - Neolamprologus brichardi


Albino Princess of Burundi – Neolamprologus brichardi


$14.99


The Albino Princess of Burundi; Neolamprologus brichardi ; features a white body; and pale orange and iridescent markings on the face. Cichlids from Lake Tanganyika can be divided into several main varieties. Some of the most popular are the shell-dwellers and torpedo-like bottom-dwellers from the genera Lamprologus ; Neolamprologus ; Altolamprologus and Julidochromis . These fish are very similar and the sceintific classification of some; especially the Neo/Alto/Lamprologus cichlids; have been reclassified often in recent years. Cichlids from the Cyprichromis and Paracyprichromis genera are open-water sardine-like fish usually found in schools in their native lake. Tropheus cichlids and the �Frontosa’s� from genus Cyphotilapia are popular large cichlids that seem beastly in comparison to the tiny �Lamps� and �Julies�. Other types of Tanganyikan cichlids include goby-like bottom-dwellers and fish known to sift through mouthfuls of substrate. Many regional variants exist in these groups. The water chemistry in the African rift lakes is notoriously unique. Lake Tanganyika is particularly hard with a very high pH; although many fish that have been captive-bred may be acclimated to more moderate conditions similar to those in Lake Victoria or Lake Malawi. As many Tanganyikan cichlids are sensitive to water quality and changes in water quality; make sure conditions are stable. Decor for a Tanganyikan aquarium should provide rockwork for the cichlids to hide in and around and can be created using tufa rock or lava rock. As most species sift through the substrate; open areas should also be provided. Tanks housing open-water or larger species should be more sparsely decorated. The substrate for these aquariums should be fine and smooth-edged; whitish coral sand or black buffered substrate is popular. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics!

Albino Eureka Red Peacock - Aulonocara jacobfreibergi - Juvenile


Albino Eureka Red Peacock – Aulonocara jacobfreibergi – Juvenile


$15.99


Aulonocara jacobfreibergi may be referred to as the Malawi Butterfly Cichlid or Fairy Cichlid in general terms but is usually referred to more specifically based on its many variations. This cichlid has several popular regional variation or color variations but most share a white dorsal and tail trim. Keeping different variations is not recommended as they may cross-breed; muddling up the differences that make each variation unique. This species is one of the largest and most aggressive of the Peacocks and requires a meatier; higher-protein diet than most other African cichlids; both Peacocks and the rock-dwelling Mbunas. The Eureka Red Peacock is a variety that is not found in the wild in Lake Malawi. It is an aquacultured variant bred from A. jacobfreibergi found in the Otter Point region of the lake. The adult males are exceptionally red in the fins and along the upper half of the body; those the sides retain some of the original blue coloration. Females and juveniles are brownish-grey with darker vertical bars but may have some yellow in the anal and pelvic fins. An albino variant has also been developed with a whitish body; orange-red hue and red eyes. The fish pictured here is an adult. Aulonocara are called Peacock Cichlids due to the fantastic coloration developed by dominant males. There are many color variants that have developed within species at different points in the lake. Females and juveniles are generally silvery-grey in most Aulonocara . They are mouthbrooders and will carry fry for 3 weeks or more before expelling the fry. These fish are rock dwellers and should be supplied with a rocky environment to establish territory. Males should be housed singly with several females; and preferably not with more aggressive Mbunas (rock-dwelling cichlids); as peacocks are not terribly aggressive; relatively. Peacock cichlids may be housed with other species of Lake Malawi fish with similar temperament. They should not be housed with other Peacocks unless ample room is provided; and males may not develop brilliant colors due to dominance issues. Research will help the aquarist pick out the most appropriate fish to mix. Aulonocara will accept both flake or pellet food soon after being introduced into the aquarium. A variety of foods is recommended to encourage coloration and supply the fish with appropriate vitamins and minerals. They may also be fed frozen foods as a healthy treat. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics!

Albino Red Top Zebra - Metriaclima pyrsonotos - Juvenile


Albino Red Top Zebra – Metriaclima pyrsonotos – Juvenile


$11.99


The albino variant of the Red Top Zebra; Metriaclima pyrsonotos ; lacks normal pigmentation; but may still show orange-red in the dorsal fin and tail. Normally; dominant males of this species have deep blue bodies with red in the dorsal and tail; and they may show black bars depending on mood. Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. Decor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock �piles� and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics! ** Note about scientific naming : As African cichlids are continually being discovered and redescribed; many scientific names have been changed over time. One of the most affected groups are the fish from the genera Pseudotropheus ; Maylandia ; and Metriaclima . Many of these fish were originally classified in the Pseudotropheus genus but the ”Zebra” group was separated into the Maylandia genus created in 1984. In 1997; the new Metriaclima genus was created as a proposed ”more correct” genus to replace Maylandia . However; the true ”correctness” of the classifications is still highly debated and those three genera are still used interchangeably to refer to the same fish in some references. **

Albino Taiwan Reef - Protomelas steveni - Juvenile


Albino Taiwan Reef – Protomelas steveni – Juvenile


$12.99


This Protomelas steveni strain originates from Taiwan Reef in the middle of Lake Malawi. These colorful Protomelas are often confused with the Peacock cichlids from genus Aulonocara . Dominant males feature brilliant blue coloration on the head and back; accented with yellow flanks and belly and a red anal fin. A white blaze adorns the forehead and stretches into the dorsal fin. Females and juveniles are silver. Although the variant sold here is commonly known as the ”Albino” Taiwan Reef among hobbyists; it is not a true albino. It has a muted pastel coloration but has black eyes rather than the true red eyes of albino animals and is likely a leucistic variant or line-bred hybrid. Malawian and Victorian cichlids are similar in care and temperament; leading to fish from these two lakes being grouped together in the hobby. Several hundreds species of cichlid are found in Lake Malawi; along with many regional variations; but Lake Victoria has far fewer due to the introduction of invasive predators. Most cichlids in both lakes are rock-dwellers. They seldom stray far from the rocky bottoms and sides of the lake and will quickly dart into the rocks to hide. As with all cichlids; they are very territorial and will not tolerate other cichlids around �their� crevice. Two of the most popular groups of these cichlids are the �Peacocks� (mostly the Aulonocara genus) and �Mbuna’s� (native term for �rock fish� and including the genera Pseudotropheus ; Labidochromis ; Maylandia ; Melanochromis and others). While aggression and compatibility can vary from species to species; mixing Mbuna and Peacock cichlids is not usually recommended. Mbuna cichlids tend to be more aggressive and may bully the usually more passive Peacocks but some Mbuna cichlids are far more aggressive than others. Several other groups of cichlids can also be found from these lakes; some of which can be large and aggressive predators; research all choices carefully. Decor for a Malawi/Victoria aquarium should be very rocky. Rock �piles� and shelf-like backgrounds are common designs and can be made from tufa rock; lava rock or slate. Substrates can range from the whitish coral sand used in saltwater aquariums to black freshwater sand or even regular decorative gravels. Wood tends to lower pH and is not usually recommended for African cichlid aquariums. Visit That Fish Blog for more information from our marine biologists and aquarium staff on African cichlids and many other topics!

African Cichlid Chemistry -1.1 lb.


African Cichlid Chemistry -1.1 lb.


$18.39


Specially formulated mixture of carbonates; sulfates; and chlorides of sodium; magnesium; calcium and potassium with all necessary minor and trace minerals to approximate Rift Lake water chemistry. Designed to provide natural water chemistry to African cichlids and other rift lake fishes without significantly raising pH. Compatible with and designed for use with A F Cichlid Buffer for pH control and A F Cichlid Rift Lake Trace Elements. Contains no phosphates; nitrates; silicates or organics to pollute the system. (Note: competing products usually contain very high levels of silicates which encourage diatom (algae) growth on the tank walls This product does not) A F Cichlid Chemistry will also benefit most American cichlids whose waters are hard and have high pH’s above 7.8. First read the considerations for use section below. Use 1 to 4 teaspoons (6 to 24 grams) of A F Cichlid Chemistry per 10 gallons (38 l) for initial tank setup or for water changes; depending on initial hardness and desired value. Next use A F Cichlid Buffer to adjust pH and alkalinity to the proper value.

African Cichlid Buffer - 1.1 lb.


African Cichlid Buffer – 1.1 lb.


$14.09


Automatic pH buffer and alkalinity or carbonate hardness (KH) adjusting system designed for African cichlids and other rift lake fishes. Also works well for many American cichlids whose native waters have high pH’s of above 7.8. Provides a stable pH environment. Dissolves instantly with little or no precipitation. Compatible with and designed for use with A F Cichlid Chemistry and A F Cichlid Rift Lake Trace Elements by Kent Marine. Free of polluting nitrates; phosphates; and organic chemicals. Read the considerations for use section below. First; for initial setup; or for water changes; use A F Cichlid Chemistry by Kent as directed on its label. Then dissolve one teaspoon (6 grams) of A F Cichlid Buffer (this product) in a glass of fresh water. Add directly to tank for each 10-20 gallons (40 to 80 liters) of tank capacity each day until the desired alkalinity is reached.

Cichlid Grow - 14.5 oz.


Cichlid Grow – 14.5 oz.


$18.39


Want to get the very best out of your cichlids? Cichlid Grow is super concentrated for super effectiveness. It is the formula for total health of all African cichlids. Contains trace elements found in Lakes Malawi and Tanganyika. Promotes vibrant colors for an outstanding appearance; supplemented with potassium and magnesium for rapid growth and increased resistance to disease.
Thomas Riggson posted at 2012-10-22 Category: Freshwater Aquarium

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